6 Health Tips to Maintain Good Eyesight

Good Eyesight

Good Eyesight

Avoiding stress, getting enough sleep and finding enough hours in a day is certainly challenging but with poor eyesight all our tasks become even more difficult.

By: Natasha Morgan

As we reach middle age, we start to pay attention to advice that will keep our minds and bodies in good shape. Putting on a few extra pounds, menopause and wishing our arms were a little longer when reading small print are irrefutable signs that we are aging.

For many of us, an early sign that we are not getting any younger is reaching for our “readers” more often. We take our eyesight for granted until it begins to deteriorate.

We start to worry. Where is this taking us? Is there a way of slowing down the process?

We can’t stop the clock from ticking but we can take action to stave off the worst effects.

Here are some tips from experts:

Fish
Recent studies show that at least two servings of fatty, omega-3 rich seafood not only helps your eyesight but your heart as well.
Best sources: Salmon, trout, sardines, herring and Arctic char, fish-oil capsules

Nuts
Nuts have anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties that affect eye health since they may reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes.
Add: 1/4 cup of nuts a few times a week

Lutein
Protect your eyes from damaging UV light with this phytochemical  found in many veggies.
Best sources: Spinach, Swiss chard, kale, collard greens, rapini
Lesser amounts: Green peas, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, nectarines and oranges.

Zinc
There is some evidence that zinc can benefit eye health but findings from studies using zinc supplements have been mixed.
Best sources: Oysters, seafood, red meat, poultry, yogurt, wheat bran, wheat germ, whole grains and enriched breakfast cereals

Antioxidants
Vitamins C, E and beta-carotene fight against free radicals that damage cells in your body.
Best source of vitamin C: Citrus fruit, cantaloupe, kiwi, mango, strawberries, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cauliflower, red pepper and tomato juice
Best source of vitamin E: Wheat germ, nuts, seeds, vegetable oils, whole grains, kale
Best source of Beta-carotene: Dark green vegetables, carrots, winter squash, sweet potato, nectarines, peaches, mango, papaya

Low glycemic foods
Avoid eating high glycemic foods such as refined (white) carbohydrates and sugary products that may contribute to inflammation and cause oxidative damage to your cells.
Best source of low glycemic foods: Beans, lentils, nuts, pasta, brown rice, sweet potatoes, steel-cut or large-flake oatmeal, oat bran and bran cereals, apples, oranges, peaches, pears, berries, yogurt, milk and soy beverages.

Experts agree that a lifestyle including exercise and a healthy diet will go a long way toward keeping us in shape. Avoiding stress, getting enough sleep and finding enough hours in a day to do everything on our list is certainly challenging but with poor eyesight all our tasks become even more difficult.

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Photo: kiolero