grief, bereavement

Grief and Coping With Loss

People cope with the loss of a loved one in different ways. Most people who experience grief will cope well. Others will have severe grief and may need treatment.

 
Bereavement is the period of grief and mourning after a death. When you grieve, it’s part of the normal process of reacting to a loss. You may experience grief as a mental, physical, social or emotional reaction. Mental reactions can include anger, guilt, anxiety, sadness and despair. Physical reactions can include sleeping problems, changes in appetite, physical problems or illness.

How long bereavement lasts can depend on how close you were to the person who died, if the person’s death was expected and other factors. Friends, family and faith may be sources of support. Grief counseling or grief therapy is also helpful to some people.

People cope with the loss of a loved one in different ways. Most people who experience grief will cope well. Others will have severe grief and may need treatment. There are many things that can affect the grief process of someone who has lost a loved one to cancer. They include:

* The personality of the person who is grieving.
* The relationship with the person who died.
* The loved one’s cancer experience and the way the disease progressed
* The grieving person’s coping skills and mental health
* The amount of support the grieving person has.
* The grieving person’s cultural and religious background.
* The grieving person’s social and financial position.

The National Cancer Institute defines grief and describes the different types of grief reactions, treatments for grief, important issues for grieving children, and cultural responses to grief and loss. It is intended as a resource to help caregivers of cancer patients.

For more information please visit the National Cancer Institute website.

Photo: Kent Oncology Center