How a Healthy BMI Helps Keep a Healthy Brain

watching your BMI

Watching Your BMI

Calculating your BMI is a screening tool, not a real diagnosis, but it gives you an indication of your body fat without having to go through clinical tests.

Try saying it five times fast in a row!

Remember the old saying: “You can’t choose your family but you can choose your friends” well let’s look at a slightly different spin on that. You can’t choose your family history, your age, or your genetics but you can choose your significant lifestyle factors! Try a quick mental scan of your own significant lifestyle factors; regarding smoking, blood cholesterol, high blood pressure, physical activity levels and your weight.

How about this for your interesting fact of the day – There is a connection between how well your memory operates and how much you weigh.

BMI otherwise known as Body Mass Index has become a bit of a buzz word, and with all of the weight loss shows on TV I’m sure you have heard of it before. If you belong to a health and fitness centre, you probably already know what yours is, because it is one of the first measures the trainer takes. But did you know, though, that your BMI is one of the first things to be checked if you are worried about your memory. There is now an established link between an impaired memory and obesity, and so it is purely common-sense to find out if you are at risk of this hazard. Keeping your BMI within the healthy range is not only good for your health, fitness and general wellbeing, but it is a very important part of keeping a youthful brain and memory function. Why not try this free memory test Give It A Go!

Calculating your BMI is a screening tool, not a real diagnosis, but it gives you an indication of your body fat without having to go through actual clinical tests, although it is not used for children(many factors involved), athletes (often have a greater muscle mass which can give a distorted reading) or the very elderly.

You can use this table to find your BMI, and there are also many websites that have BMI calculators and are very easy to use.

This table is used to find out your BMI. The first row indicates weight in kilograms and second row indicates weight in pounds. Height is given in feet and inches. Based on the weight and height, your BMI or Body Mass Index is given below.
wt(kg) 45 50 55 60 65 70 75 80 85 90 95 100 105 110 115
wt(lb) 99 110 121 132 143 154 165 176 187 198 209 220 231 242 253
ht(ft,in) BMI
4’5″ 25 27 30 33 36 38 41 44 47 49 52 55 58 60 63
4’6″ 24 27 29 32 35 37 40 43 45 48 51 53 56 59 61
4’7″ 23 26 28 31 33 36 38 41 43 46 48 51 54 56 59
4’8″ 22 25 27 30 32 35 37 40 42 45 47 50 52 55 57
4’9″ 21 24 26 29 31 33 36 38 40 43 45 48 50 52 55
4’10″ 21 23 25 28 30 32 35 37 39 42 44 46 49 51 53
4’11″ 20 22 24 27 29 31 33 36 38 40 42 44 47 49 51
5’0″ 19 22 24 26 28 30 32 35 37 39 41 43 45 48 50
5’1″ 19 21 23 25 27 29 31 33 35 37 40 42 44 46 48
5’2″ 18 20 22 24 26 28 30 32 34 37 39 41 43 45 47
5’3″ 18 20 21 23 25 27 29 31 33 35 37 39 41 43 45
5’4″ 17 19 21 23 24 26 28 30 32 34 36 38 40 41 43
5’5″ 17 18 20 22 24 26 28 29 31 33 35 37 39 40 42
5’6″ 16 18 19 21 23 25 27 28 30 32 34 35 37 39 41
5’7″ 16 17 19 21 22 24 26 28 29 31 33 35 36 38 40
5’8″ 15 17 18 20 22 23 25 27 28 30 32 33 35 37 38
5’9″ 15 16 18 20 21 23 24 26 28 29 31 33 34 36 38
5’10″ 14 16 17 19 21 22 24 25 27 28 30 32 33 35 36
5’11″ 14 15 17 19 20 22 23 25 26 28 29 31 32 34 35
6’0″ 13 15 16 18 19 21 22 24 25 27 28 30 31 33 34
6’1″ 13 15 16 18 19 20 22 23 25 26 28 29 31 32 34
6’2″ 13 14 16 17 18 20 21 23 24 25 27 28 30 31 33
6’3″ 12 14 15 16 18 19 21 22 23 25 26 27 29 30 32
6’4″ 12 13 15 16 17 19 20 21 23 24 26 27 28 30 31
6’5″ 12 13 14 16 17 18 20 21 22 23 25 26 27 29 30
6’6″ 11 13 14 15 17 18 19 20 22 23 24 26 27 28 29
6’7″ 11 12 14 15 16 17 19 20 21 22 24 25 26 27 28

 

 

BMI General Interpretation
Below 18.5 Underweight
18.5 – 24.9 Normal
25.0 – 29.9 Overweight
30.0 and Above Obese

Ideally your BMI should fall somewhere between 18.5 and 24.9, and if you do your calculation and find that it is significantly higher than this, then it is probably time to start reassessing your diet and activity level.

Keep an eye on your BMI – your memory will love you for it!

About the Author:
Gillian Eadie founded the Brain and Memory Foundation. Gillian is an award-winning educator with more than 20 years as a principal at several prestigious private schools and is a Churchill Fellow. For more free help and personal advice on diet, exercise, brain food and improving your memory, please visit the Brain and Memory Foundation. You’ll find lots more information and tips like these in the great new book by Allison Lamont PhD and Gillian Eadie,Seven Second Memory.

Photo: Waverly Weight Loss