The Macs-Lift Explained

Macs Lift


Patients want more of a European-type change that is subtle and youthful rather than the more obvious American-type facelift, which can create a wind-tunnel effect or skin that looks too tight.

By: Dr. Kourosh Tavakoli

Lise Petersen spoke with Sydney plastic surgeon Dr. Kourosh Tavakoli about the MACS-lift, a new European facelift that gives a more natural and softer result than a traditional facelift.

According to Sydney plastic surgeon Dr Kourosh Tavakoli, the MACS-lift, or minimal access cranial suspension lift, is a new European facelift that compares very favourably with the traditional facelift. ‘Today in Australia the emphasis is definitely on a more natural change in appearance,’ he says. ‘Patients want more of a European-type change that is subtle and youthful rather than the more obvious American-type facelift, which can create a wind-tunnel effect or skin that looks too tight.’ Dr Tavakoli says the MACS-lift involves less undermining of the skin than the traditional facelift and does not require exposing the facial nerves: ‘In fact, the extent of undermining of the skin is probably 50 per cent of that of the traditional facelift. Fixation of the underlying tissue is done by the use of permanent sutures. The scar is in front of the ear and then continues in front of the hairline. There is no extension behind the ear or into the scalp. Scarring takes less time to subside than that of the traditional facelift – only two to three weeks – because the scar is shorter. The major element affecting downtime is the swelling but this is much less dramatic than with a full facelift. The main complications relate to skin haematoma formation and delayed healing but these are fairly infrequent.’

There are many other advantages to the MACS-lift when it is compared to a full facelift. ‘The MACS-lift procedure is quicker – taking an average of two hours versus the four to five hours required for a traditional facelift – plus the operation can be performed under local anaesthesia with sedation and is tolerated quite well by the patient,’ Dr Tavakoli explains. ‘No admission to hospital is required so it can be performed as a day procedure.

Rehabilitation is fast – two weeks as opposed to four to six weeks for a traditional facelift. Downtime is a significant factor economically for the age group of patients who choose to have a facelift. For executives from the corporate world, for example, time a crucial factor.

The MACS-lift is probably best suited to the patient who is contemplating facial rejuvenation for the first time and requires mild to moderate changes in the lower third of the face and the neck region. It is suitable for both men and women.

“The MACS-lift is not designed to replace the traditional facelift completely but it is an adjunct for patients in their late 30s, 40s and probably early 50s,” concludes Dr Tavakoli. “It can also be differentiated from the S-lift, which has been the buzzword for the past few years, because it addresses the deeper layers of the skin. Liposuction in the neck region is often performed with this procedure.”

About The Author:

Dr Kourosh Tavakoli – Cosmetic Plastic Surgeon, MBBS, BSc (med), MS (unsw), FRACS (plast.) Dr Kourosh Tavakoli is a fully qualified Australian trained Plastic Surgeon specialising in Cosmetic procedures. http://www.plasticsurgerysydney.com.au.

 

Photo: ximenatapia