hand and nails

The Scoop on Gel Nails

hand and nails

Getting a manicure

 

Gel nails have become popular in recent years because the coating is thinner and look more natural. Gel nails also purport to be stronger, flexible and more resistant to chipping.

 

Going to a salon for a manicure used to be reserved for special occasions. The professional treatment was costly and had to be repeated at least once a week. Who had the time and money for such pampering?

Then came acrylic nails. If you were careful, they would keep your finger tips looking pretty for a couple of weeks. Of course, they did have a tendency to break off badly exposing an ugly nail which could only be repaired by a technician.

The desire for women to have beautiful hands fueled the industry and outweighed any potential problems acrylics presented. New nail salons appeared all over urban areas and teens as young as twelve wanted a professional manicure.

In spite of higher cost, gel nails have become popular in recent years because the coating is thinner and therefore look more natural. Gel nails purport to be stronger, flexible and more resistant to chipping. To keep them looking smooth and natural, gel needs to be inserted, between the nail and the cuticle as new growth appears. This temporary filling will keep nails looking their best for up to a month, after which the nail has to be filed down and new gel applied.

Although many women are switching from acrylic nails to gel nails, there remain potential problems:

  • * The tech applying the gel can do a sloppy job as many are untrained
  • * Some women have experienced a burning sensation as the nails are applied
  • * Some techs use white powder with pink liquid to make an underlay and then put the gel on top of natural nails.
  • * Nails can develop brown spots on the edges
  • * After only a few days, some of the edges begin to lift off
  • * Own nails can become damaged if the gel nail improperly removed
  • * Depending upon the gel used, some are resistant to acetone and must be buffed off

 
If you have thin, peeling nails and can’t resist the call of “gel nails”, be sure you research the salon first. Visit in person and check for cleanliness. Ask customers what they like about their gel nails and if they have experienced any problems. Speak to the tech and ask about training. If they don’t want you to make inquiries, move on to another salon that is happy to provide answers.

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Photo: Instant Vantage