Tips for Living with Rheumatoid Arthritis

knuckles with arthritis

Hands Suffering Arthritis

Rather than focusing on the way you should try to eat if you have rheumatoid arthritis, let’s take a few moments to consider things you want to avoid in the diet.

By: Valerie Johnston

Anyone who has been diagnosed with Rheumatoid Arthritis understands that a lot is going on with his or her body. For one thing, this form of arthritis is also called an autoimmune disease because it is caused by the body’s immune system malfunctioning. What happens is that the body has stopped recognizing the joints as part of the body and is instead viewing them as something to be cured by the immune system.

This leads to an immense amount of swelling, stiffness, and inflammation primary in the feet, wrists, and hands – though other joints can be affected too. Like so many other autoimmune issues, doctors and medical experts are still unsure why it occurs in the first place. They do know, however, how to minimize some of the symptoms through medication, therapy, and diet.

Rather than focusing on the way you should try to eat if you have rheumatoid arthritis, let’s take a few moments to consider things you want to avoid in the diet instead:

Foods that are heated, grilled, fried or pasteurized – now, don’t panic, we don’t mean all foods that are cooked or handled in this way. What we mean is the toxin known as “advanced glycation end product” or “AGE”. This is something known to trigger inflammation in the body once it is ingested. Some studies show that an entirely AGE free diet can reduce symptoms in the bodies of rheumatoid arthritis patients by roughly 60%;

Dairy foods – though you might turn to ice cream as a comfort food, it could contribute to irritation in and around the joint tissue. Dairy foods contain proteins that can lead to discomfort in the joints currently inflamed by arthritis. The best bet is to go vegan if possible;

Preservatives – you know your grandmother always warned you to avoid foods with ingredients that you couldn’t pronounce, and she was right. When we eat heavily processed diets it is likely to increase symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis. This means that you want to also reduce similar items like table salt and artificial flavorings in addition to those nasty compounds that lengthen the shelf life of processed and pre-made foods. This also means cutting the fast food and “takeout” habit too!

If you drop these items from the daily diet you are less likely to experience intense symptoms from your arthritis. Naturally, diet is not the only solution and you should work with your doctor to manage the condition.

About the Author:
Valerie Johnston is a health and fitness writer located in East Texas. With ambitions of one day running a marathon and writing for Healthline.com ensures she keeps up-to-date on all of the latest health and fitness news.

Photo: DrShapero